Angry Birds and Croods fans now keep their progress across devices – iOS and Android

If you’ve ever been frustrated by having to recomplete levels in Angry Birds or The Croods when you download the game to a new device, Rovio has you covered.

After a limited trial back in May, Rovio has now announced that its account-synchronisation feature is being rolled-out globally across both iOS and Android devices. When you download a game to a new device, you just login with your Rovio account to continue right where you left off.

The feature is currently limited to the original Angry Birds and The Croods, but Rovio will be adding all its games over time.

By Vamsi

Moto X : A phone by Google that can be customised the way yu want …

  

  Want to customise your phone the way yu want with different colours, backgrounds and yu can even have your name or the name of your loved one engraved on it???

  This was the mode of publicity followed for Moto X the first mobile by Motorola after it was acquired by Google in 2011. This much anticipated smartphone is expected to launch on 1st of August.

Image

 

 The Moto X made an appearance recently…  Google Chairman Eric Schmidt stood out from the crowd not because of what he was doing, but because of the smartphone he was using. When confronted, Schmidt explained that he was “not allowed to comment on the nature of this phone.”

  Gary He of Insider Images captured photographs of the executive using what appears to be the unreleased Moto X smartphone.

 

 

Image

 

Image

Samsung Galaxy tab 3 – Planning to buy one ? Just go through this ..

  

  This is a brief description on the recently launched mid size budgeted tablets by the South Korean giant SAMSUNG, the Samsung galaxy tab 3 T211 (a 7” tablet) and Samsung galaxy tab 3 T311 (an 8” one). The “3″ in the name is because this is the third generation of Galaxy Tab devices. Samsung kept clinging on to its signature design language with both the tablets which are similar to S4.

Nothing much is disturbed in the 7” galaxy tab 3 T211 compared to its predecessor except

  • The processor which is updated from dual core 1 GHz processor to dual core 1.2 GHz processor which gives improved performance and multi tasking capability.
  • An improved secondary camera mainly very useful for people who use Skype and related apps.

  People who are planning for a decent budgeted device can go for this without a second thought as it does its job fairly well.

  The resolution of the device is not disturbed leaving it with a pixel density of 170 ppi, which I personally don’t like and which mainly pulled me back when I was planning to buy a tablet in a 7” range (I mainly consider a pixel density of 200 or more as a decent one because the main purpose of a tablet is eBook reading, browsing etc everything related to text more than images, at least for students). But by improving the processor and the front camera, Samsung made this 3rd gen 7” tablet attractive in 17k price range and for this comfortable price tag this tablet is a good steal.

 Coming to the 8” tablet, The Galaxy Tab 3 8.0 is a good-looking device. 

Yu can see the difference in the size of bezel here …

 That increase in one inch of display really matters. Actually the measure of the screen size diagonally does a poor job in explaining how the screen looks. (Can yu really believe that the viewing area of a 10” tablet is almost double that of a 7” tab with just an increase of 3 inches in the diagonal!!)

 Samsung did a nice job by keeping the size of the tablet to a minimum by scrapping it off from the size bezels. Yes, this 8” tablet’s bezel is decreased to keep the size of the tablet to a minimum.

 

 

Things to consider if yu are going for the 8” tab…

Pro s

  • First thing is that the pixel density of this tab is 189 ppi (The screen size is increased and with increase in screen size, the resolution is also increased to 1280 X 800 pixels, finally arriving at a density of 189ppi, better than the 7” tab)
  • The improved processor and camera in tab 3 makes it a good upgrade.

Con s

  • The main important problem with this 8” tab is that the bezels are chopped off to keep the size to a minimum. So if yu want to hold it with one hand, then yu can do so by holding it like a mobile wrapping it with your hand around its back. But, there will be a problem in holding the device with one hand with a thumb on the front part of the tablet, as yu do not have enough space.
  • While yu are operating this 8” tab in landscape mode, be careful that your fingers do not touch the back button.
  • For now, its overpriced, but just wait for few months… The price of both the tablets will come down for sure…

Note:

Image I just want to point out the difference between Apple and Samsung here… iPad mini also has a very thin bezel, but the software in iPad mini is programmed to intelligently recognize whether your thumb is simply resting on the display or whether you’re intentionally interacting with it. So it’s a great example of how Apple’s hardware and software work together to give the best experience possible.

Steve, The Perfectionist

Steve Jobs …

 The name itself has become a symbol of perfection. One other name that come into my mind when I think of Steve is Bill…Yeah, Bill gates. I happen to read an article in some magazine recently saying that there is no relationship in history like that of Steve Jobs and Bill Gates. I don’t know history much but I feel that’s true. When I was reading Steve jobs biography written by Walter Isaacson, I was really impressed by the absolute perfection Steve was trying to achieve at every point of his product making. Every inch of the product should be like the way he wanted and he is willing to go to any extent to achieve the desired perfection. The credit is not Steve s alone. He got the inspiration from his father.

“Jobs remembered being impressed by his father’s focus on craftsmanship. “I thought my dad’s sense of design was pretty good,” he said, “because he knew how to build anything”

                                 Steve with his father Paul Jobs

                                              

 “When he built our fence, he gave me a hammer so I could work with him. Fifty years later the fence still surrounds the back and side yards of the house in Mountain View”.

His father loved doing things right. He even cared about the look of the parts you couldn’t see. The same was inculcated by Steve. Steve not only was careful of the exterior design of the product but he was very much concerned about how the device looked from the inside.

Some words by Jobs friend about his products design and perfection.

“Jobs had always indulged his obsession that the unseen parts of a product should be crafted as beautifully as its façade, just as his father had taught him when they were building a fence. This too he took to extremes when he found himself unfettered at NeXT. He made sure that the screws inside the machine had expensive plating. He even insisted that the matte black finish be coated onto the inside of the cube’s case, even though only repairmen would see it.”

 “At most other companies, engineering tends to drive design. The engineers set forth their specifications and requirements, and the designers then come up with cases and shells that will accommodate them. For Jobs, the process tended to work the other way”

 And one more aspect of him that I liked a lot, is that he wants complete control over the products that he invented(I think I can use the word invented because the concept of iPod and iPad was brought by Steve). He doesn’t want everyone messing around with his products. So he completely sealed off his products, not even for changing the battery. “Apple discovered in 2011 that third-party repair shops were opening up the iPhone 4, so it replaced the tiny screws with a tamper-resistant Pentalobe screw that was impossible to open with a commercially available screwdriver. By not having a replaceable battery, it was possible to make the iPhone much thinner. For Jobs, thinner was always better. “He’s always believed that thin is beautiful,” said Tim Cook. “You can see that in all of the work. We have the thinnest notebook, the thinnest smartphone, and we made the iPad thin and then even thinner.” These are some words from the book. Some incidents that I liked from the book ….

Ice Water in Hell

Once for a joint interview, both Steve and his friend and rival Gates agreed to give a joint appearance. Jobs arrived before Gates and was being interviewed. iPod became very popular by then and Apple designed iTunes for Windows after turning down many requests for it. He was asked like what it was to be a Windows developer, since iTunes program was by then installed on hundreds of millions of Windows PCs.

He quipped: “It’s like giving a glass of ice water to someone in Hell.”

                                                              During the interview

                                                      

 When Gates later arrived and heard about the comment, he was, naturally, enraged, because my partner Kara Swisher and I had assured both men that we hoped to keep the joint session on a high plane.(these people were the interviewers and in their own words).

 In a pre-interview meeting, Gates said to Jobs: “So I guess I’m the representative from Hell.” Jobs merely handed Gates a cold bottle of water he was carrying. The tension was broken, and the interview was a triumph, with both men acting like statesmen.

 

 When the technology strategist Lise Buyer, who was in the audience, asked what each had learned from observing the other. 

 “Well, I’d give a lot to have Steve’s taste,” Gates answered

 “The way he does things is just different and I think it’s magical. And in that case, wow.”

Jobs stared at the floor. Later he told me that he was blown away by how honest and gracious Gates had just been. Jobs was equally honest, though not quite as gracious ;-), when his turn came”

 

 What exactly inspired Jobs to create the iPad?

 One of the people who was building Microsoft’s tablet was friendly with Jobs’ wife, Laurene Powell. He asked Jobs and Powell to come to his fiftieth birthday party. Jobs went, reluctantly, says Isaacson. At the party, the guy was telling Jobs about the Microsoft tablet and how great it was going to be. This did not go over so well. Here, in his own words, Jobs describes what happened, and what he did next:

“This guy badgered me about how Microsoft was going to completely change the world with this tablet PC software and eliminate all notebook computers, and Apple ought to license his Microsoft software. But he was doing the device all wrong. It had a stylus. As soon as you have a stylus, you’re dead. This dinner was like the tenth time he talked to me about it, and I was so sick of it that I came home and said, “F**k this, let’s show him what a tablet can really be.”

Jobs says he went into Apple the next day and asked for a multi-touch tablet with no keyboard or stylus. He got one six months later. Instead of making it a tablet, though, Apple shrank it and made the iPhone.

Later on, they released the iPad.

Image

                                                         Steve, when introducing iPad

 

 A fascinating insight. And hey – Microsoft still can’t manage to release a tablet that people will actually buy!

 

Steve’s opinion about other companies

 Rather than his opinion about other companies I would say his dissatisfaction about the entire field. These were in his own words … “I have my own theory about why decline happens at companies like IBM or Microsoft. The company does a great job, innovates and becomes a monopoly or close to it in some field, and then the quality of the product becomes less important. The company starts valuing the great salesmen, because they’re the ones who can move the needle on revenues, not the product engineers and designers. So the salespeople end up running the company”

“Some people say, “Give the customers what they want.” But that’s not my approach. Our job is to figure out what they’re going to want before they do.”

 

Jobs about Gates

 “They were very good at the business side of things. They were never as ambitious product-wise as they should have been. Bill likes to portray himself as a man of the product, but he’s really not. He’s a businessperson. Winning business was more important than making great products. He ended up the wealthiest guy around, and if that was his goal, then he achieved it. But it’s never been my goal, and I wonder, in the end, if it was his goal!”